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In 1882, the first Labor Day celebration took place. According to the US Department of Labor, the procession was organized by the Central Labor Union in New York. However, in 1887, Oregon became the first state to declare Labor Day a holiday. However, it wasn't a legal holiday in every state.

 

The great Pullman Strike occurred in the summer of 1894, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica, when workers boycotted railroads to demand safe working conditions, regular timetables, and decent salaries. Following this, President Grover Cleveland designated Labor Day a national holiday to celebrate the labor movement.

Today, millions of Americans celebrate Labor Day with a day off at backyard barbecues or beaches in the United States. Millions more will take advantage of fantastic end-of-season deals at local shopping malls across the country during Labor Day sales. Of course, wearing white after Labor Day is still a major fashion faux pas. No one knows why or how it started, but after the last fling of summer, white was out and darker clothes were in.

 

 

Parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays, and other public gatherings are still held in cities and towns around the United States on Labor Day. It marks the conclusion of summer and the beginning of the back-to-school season for many Americans, particularly children and young adults.